“A seminal figure in Irish music”

-The Rough Guide to Irish Music

Dáithí Sproule

Scéala an Gheimhridh

Greetings! Even though it is now theoretically spring in Ireland, it is definitely still winter in Minnesota. I’m off in a few weeks with Altan for our regular North American tour — starting in Canada this time for a few concerts. Our new CD “The Gap of Dreams” will be out for the tour, and we’re very happy with it. We recorded it in November in Donegal and everything came together beautifully with great songs and tunes, old and new, and Mairéad’s daughter, Nia, and Mark’s son, Sam, playing compositions of theirs with us on a lively track. I particularly enjoyed doing some songs with Mairéad — she’s in fabulous form — and playing with Ciarán Curran on his featured selection. Another beloved group of mine, Trian (with Billy McComiskey and Liz Carroll), are playing three festivals sprinkled through the year — Baltimore Tradfest, Susquehanna Festival and Harvest Home in Saint Paul — you never know, there might be a few more! As always for the last ten years or so, I continue teaching lessons at the wonderful Center for Irish Music in Saint Paul. See you along the road! All the best, Dáithí

Dáithí Sproule – Lost River, Vol. 1

Dáithí Sproule - Lost River

Featuring songs in Irish and English, exquisitely arranged and accompanied on guitar, the album includes guest performances by Seamus McGuire, Peter Ostroushko, Tom Schaefer, Randal Bays, Liz Carroll, Billy McComiskey, Danielle Enblom, Laura MacKenzie, John Wright, Dean Magraw, James Kelly, Paddy O’Brien, and Altan.

Upcoming shows

Courses

At Center for Irish Music in St. Paul

Spring Session 2018: 

  • Irish Gaelic Songs for Young Singers
  • Uisce Gorm - Tuesday Night Adult Ensemble
  • Irish Language for Young Adults
  • Poetry in Irish from the Earliest Times

Fall Session 2017:

  • Irish Gaelic Songs for Young Singers
  • Learning Traditional Songs in Irish and English
  • Uisce Gorm - Tuesday Night Adult Ensemble
  • Irish Myths and Legends
  • Introduction to Early Ireland